The place we used to live

Foto 1

Foto 1

The picture of the ruin is taken with our backs to the road (the west). The house burned down in 1970. There was still one tea bush standing and there was a lot of dust, due to the eruptions of the volcano Lahungung. There were no victims, only dust until Australia! (Martien, 1982).

Foto 2

Foto 2

Grown coconut trees were standing there now. When you look across the place where the vegetable garden used to be, you can see the kampong of Bodjong Genteng. The vegetable garden was useful, because you had to supply yourself of vegetables. The city and stores were far away. Bodjong Genteng has houses of stone now.

On the left you can see a hill, where used to be a little deer. This was the drive way and the horse stables were on the rights. I was looking for traces of our past in such an intense manner, that insects bit both my arms many times. People helped me by dabbing them. At the same height, there were also a couple of houses under which I used to play in my memory.

 

Foto 3

Foto 3

Here is the upper step of the stairs that led to the kampong from this hill. I took some pieces from it with me.

Foto 4

Foto 4

We went downhill alongside the road to Bodjong Genteng. And who would have thought, at the end there were still ten steps left. We also found a wall, which was still standing, of the former tea factory (picture on the left). It was burnt black. No tea is cultivated here any more. We drove away and I looked back and filmed that last pair of steps, picture on the right.

 

Here, you can see a scheme of the place where we used to live. The lay out of the house. The road to Bodjong Genteng, the vegetable garden. On the pictures you can see the remaining piece of the tea factory and the stairs.

Foto 5

Foto 5

Foto 6

Foto 6

Foto 5

Foto 7

We looked at the home of sir Jonkheer, who carried out the job of Pierre Schrijnen for a short time after the war.

Soekaboemi. We were allowed to stay at the Franciscanessen monastery in a cell of their retreat house. This used to be part of the Liduina hospital, in which I was born. But now, this connection has been shut down and they are no longer allowed to work there. The hospital is controlled by the state now. The nuns still have other jobs. The hospital has not thrived since then. There are also mosques on both sides, which cause you to hear the prayer many times a day. The dogs in the neighborhood start whining every time. I though that this was probably not good for the patients. Just as at the Carolus Boromeus and other places, the grass was cut with the hand! It looked very neat! I got sick. The advised restaurant was not as safe as we thought. But there was no panic. Two small, female doctors from the hospital visited me and helped me get better again. Jannie visited as well. And what did she bring? Soup and a lot of Indische cookies, that would help me get well soon!

Foto 7

Foto 8

This is the Wilhelmina School in Soekaboemi, the pre-school, which I attended for a couple of months when father and mother went to the Netherlands with my youngest sister, Claartje. It was the class on the right. I noticed that there was no longer an open auditorium, but that they had closed everything up. Open porches are now closed or covered with bars. Something that we noticed everywhere: Indonesia has become unsafe. An old Indonesian who we talked to told us that, whatever went wrong during the 300 years of the Dutch colony, all of that was not as bad as what happened to them in three years Japanese occupation.